Paragraph Completion CAT

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How to prepare for paragraph completion in CAT

 

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Must do questions

 

Directions for questions 1 to 4: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way. CAT 2008

1. Most people at their first consultation take a furtive look at the surgeon’s hands in the hope of reassurance. Prospective patients look for delicacy, sensitivity, steadiness, perhaps unblemished pallor. On this basis, Henry Perowne loses a number of cases each year. Generally, he knows it’s about to happen before the patient does: the downward glance repeated, the prepared questions beginning to falter, the overemphatic thanks during the retreat to the door.
(1) Other people do not communicate due to their poor observation.
(2) Other patients don’t like what they see but are ignorant of their right to go elsewhere.
(3) But Perowne himself is not concerned.
(4) But others will take their place, he thought.
(5) These hands are steady enough, but they are large.

2. Trade protectionism, disguised as concern for the climate, is raising its head. Citing competitiveness concerns, powerful industrialized countries are holding out threats of a levy on imports of energy-intensive products from developing countries that refuse to accept their demands. The actual source of protectionist sentiment in the OECD countries is, of course, their current lackluster economic performance, combined with the challenges posed by he rapid economic rise of China and India – in that order.
(1) Climate change is evoked to bring trade protectionism through the back door.
(2) OECD countries are taking refuge in climate change issues to erect trade barriers against these two countries.
(3) Climate change concerns have come as a convenient stick to beat the rising trade power of China and India.
(4) Defenders of the global economic status quo are posing as climate change champions.
(5) Today’s climate change champions are the perpetrators of global economic inequity.

3. Mattancherry is Indian Jewry’s most famous settlement. Its pretty streets of pastel coloured houses, connected by first-floor passages and home to the last twelve saree-and-sarongwearing, white-skinned Indian Jews are visited by thousands of tourists each year. Its synagogue, built in 1568, with a floor of blue-and-white Chinese tiles, a carpet given by Haile Selassie and the frosty Yaheh selling tickets at the door, stands as an image of religious tolerance.
(1) Mattancherry represents, therefore, the perfect picture of peaceful co-existence.
(2) India’s Jews have almost never suffered discrimination, except for European colonizers and each other.
(3) Jews in India were always tolerant.
(4) Religious tolerance has always been only a facade and nothing more.
(5) The pretty pastel streets are, thus, very popular with the tourists.

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4. Given the cultural and intellectual interconnections, the question of what is ‘Western’ and what is ‘Eastern’ (or Indian) is often hard to decide, and the issue can be discussed only in more dialectical terms. The diagnosis of a thought as ‘purely Western’ or ‘purely Indian’ can be very illusory.
(1) Thoughts are not the kind of things that can be easily categorized.
(2) Though ‘occidentalism’ and ‘orientalism’ as dichotomous concepts have found many adherents.
(3) ‘East is East and West is West’ has been a discredited notion for a long time now.
(4) Compartmentalizing thoughts is often desirable.
(5) The origin of a thought is not the kind of thing to which ‘purity’ happens easily.

Directions for Questions 5 to 7: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way. CAT 2007

5. Characters are also part of deep structure. Characters tie events in a story together and provide a thread of continuity and meaning. Stories can be about individuals, groups, projects or whole organizations, so from an organizational studies perspective, the focal actor(s) determine the level and unit of analysis used in a study. Stories of mergers and acquisitions, for example, are common place. In these stories whole organizations are personified as actors. But these macro-level stories usually are not told from the perspective of the macro-level participants, because whole organizations cannot narrate their experiences in the first person.
(1) More generally, data concerning the identities and relationships of the characters in the story are required, if one is to understand role structure and social networks in which that process is embedded.
(2) Personification of a whole organization abstracts away from the particular actors and from traditional notions of level of analysis.
(3) The personification of a whole organization is important because stories differ depending on who is enacting various events.
(4) Every story is told from a particular point of view, with a particular narrative voice, which is not regarded as part of the deep structure.
(5) The personification of a whole organization is a textual device we use to make macro-level theories more comprehensible.

6. Nevertheless, photographs still retain some of the magical allure that the earliest daguerreotypes inspired.
As objects, our photographs have changed; they have become physically flimsier as they have become more technologically sophisticated. Daguerre produced pictures on copper plates; today many of our photographs never become tangible thins, but instead remain filed away on computers and cameras, part of the digital ether that envelops the modern world. At the same time, our patience for the creation of images has also eroded. Children today are used to being tracked from birth by digital cameras and video recorders and they expect to see the results of their poses and performances instantly. The space between life as it is being lived and life as it is being displayed shrinks to a mere second.
(1) Yet, despite these technical developments, photographs still remain powerful because they are reminders of the people and things we care about.
(2) Images, after all, are surrogates carried into battle by a soldier or by a traveller on holiday.
(3) Photographs, be they digital or traditional, exist to remind us of the absent, the beloved, and the dead.
(4) In the new era of the digital image, the images also have a greater potential for fostering falsehood and trickery, perpetuating fictions that seem so real we cannot tell the difference.
(5) Anyway, human nature being what it is, little time has passed after photography’s inventions became means of living life through images.

7. Mma Ramotswe had a detective agency in Africa, at the foot of Kgale Hill. These were its assets; a tiny white van, two desks, two chairs, a telephone, and an old typewriter. Then there was a teapot, in which Mma Ramotswe – the only private lady detective in Botswana – brewed red bush tea. And three mugs – one for herself, one for her secretary and one for the client. What else does a detective agency really nee? Detective agencies rely on human intuition and intelligence, both of which Mma Ramotswe had in abundance.
(1) But there was also the view, which again would appear on no inventory.
(2) No inventory would ever include those, of course.
(3) She had an intelligent secretary too.
(4) She was a good detective and a good woman.
(5) What she lacked in possessions was more than made up by a natural shrewdness.

Paragraph Completion CAT by Cetking

Directions for Questions 8 to 12: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the one that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

I am sometimes attacked for imposing ‘rules‘. Nothing could be further from the truth. I hate rules. All I do is report on how consumers react to different stimuli. I may say to a copywriter, —Research shows that commercials with celebrities are below average in persuading people to buy products. Are you sure you want to use a celebrity? Call that a rule? Or I may say to an art director, —Research suggests that if you set the copy in black type on a white background, more people will read it than if you set it in white type on a black background.“
Guidance based on applied research can hardly qualify as ‘rules‘.
Thus, all my so called ‘rules‘ are rooted in applied research.
A suggestion perhaps, but scarcely a rule.
Such principles are unavoidable if one wants to be systematic about consumer behavior.
Fundamentally it is about consumer behavior œ not about celebrities or type settings

9. Relations between the factory and the dealer are distant and usually strained as the factory tries to force cars on the dealers to smooth out production. Relations between the dealer and the customer are equally strained because dealers continuously adjust prices œ make deals œ to adjust demand with supply while maximizing profits. This becomes a system marked by a lack of long-term commitment on either side, which maximizes feelings of mistrust. In order to maximize their bargaining positions, everyone holds back information œ the dealer about the product and the consumer about his true desires.
1. As a result, “deal making‘ becomes rampant, without concern for customer satisfaction.
2. As a result, inefficiencies creep into the supply chain.
3. As a result, everyone treats the other as an adversary, rather than as an ally.
4. As a result, fundamental innovations are becoming scarce in the automobile industry.
5. As a result, everyone loses in the long run.

10. In the evolving world order, the comparative advantage of the United States lies in its military force. Diplomacy and international law have always been regarded as annoying encumbrances, unless they can be used to advantage against an enemy. Every active player in world affairs professes to seek only peace and to prefer negotiation to violence and coercion.
1. However, diplomacy has often been used as a mask by nations which intended to use force.
2. However, when the veil is lifted, we commonly see that diplomacy is understood as a disguise for the rule of force.
3. However, history has shown that many of these nations do not practice what they profess.
4. However, history tells us that peace is professed by those who intend to use violence.
5. However, when unmasked, such nations reveal a penchant for the use of force.

11. Age has a curvilinear relationship with the exploitation of opportunity. Initially, age will increase the likelihood that a person will exploit an entrepreneurial opportunity because people gather much of the knowledge necessary to exploit opportunities over the course of their lives, and because age provides credibility in transmitting that information to others. However, as people become older, their willingness to bear risks declines, their opportunity costs rise, and they become less receptive to new information.
1. As a result, people transmit more information rather than experiment with new ideas as they reach an advanced age.
2. As a result, people are reluctant to experiment with new ideas as they reach an advanced age.
3. As a result, only people with lower opportunity costs exploit opportunity when they reach an advanced age.
4. As a result, people become reluctant to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities when they reach an advanced age.
5. As a result, people depend on credibility rather than on novelty as they reach an advanced age.

12. We can usefully think of theoretical models as maps, which help us navigate unfamiliar territory. The most accurate map that it is possible to construct would be of no practical use whatsoever, for it would be an exact replica, on exactly the same scale, of the place where we were. Good maps pull out the most important features and throw away a huge amount of much less valuable information. Of course, maps can be bad as well as good œ witness the attempts by medieval Europe to produce a map of the world. In the same way, a bad theory, no matter how impressive it may seem in principle, does little or nothing to help us understand a problem.
1. But good theories, just like good maps, are invaluable, even if they are simplified.
2. But good theories, just like good maps, will never represent unfamiliar concepts in detail.
3. But good theories, just like good maps, need to balance detail and feasibility of representation.
4. But good theories, just like good maps, are accurate only at a certain level of abstraction.
5. But good theories, just like good maps, are useful in the hands of a user who knows their limitations.

Directions for Questions 13 to 16: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the one that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way. CAT 2005

13. The audiences for crosswords and sudoku, understandably, overlap greatly, but there are differences, too. A crossword attracts a more literary person, while sudoku appeals to a keenly logical mind. Some crossword enthusiasts turn up their noses at sudoku because they feel it lacks depth. A good crossword requires vocabulary, knowledge, mental flexibility and sometimes even a sense of humor to complete. It touches numerous areas of life and provides an “Aha!” or two along the way. _______________________
1. Sudoku, on the other hand, is just a logical exercise, each one similar to the last.
2. Sudoku, incidentally, is growing faster in popularity than crosswords, even among the literati.
3. Sudoku, on the other hand, can be attempted and enjoyed even by children.
4. Sudoku, however, is not exciting in any sense of the term

14. Most firms consider expert individuals to be too elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. Force such people to collaborate on a high-stakes project and they just might come to fisticuffs. Even the very notion of managing such a group seems unimaginable. So most organizations fall into default mode, setting up project teams of people who get along nicely. ________________________
1. The result, however, is disastrous.
2. The result is mediocrity.
3. The result is creation of experts who then become elitists.
4. Naturally, they drive innovations.

15. Federer’s fifth grand slam win prompted a reporter to ask whether he was the best ever. Federer is certainly not lacking in confidence, but he wasn’t about to proclaim himself the best ever. “The best player of this generation, yes”, he said, “But nowhere close to ever. Just look at the records that some guys have. I’m a minnow.” ________________________
1. His win against Agassi, a genius from the previous generation, contradicts that.
2. Sampras, the king of an earlier generation, was as humble.
3. He is more than a minnow to his contemporaries.
4. The difference between ‘the best of this generation’ and ‘the best ever’ is a matter of perception.’

16. Thus the end of knowledge and the closing of the frontier that it symbolizes is not a looming crisis at all, but merely one of many embarrassing fits of hubris in civilization’s long industry. In the end, it will pass away and be forgotten. Ours is not the first generation to struggle to understand the organizational laws of the frontier, deceive itself that it has succeeded, and go to its grave having failed. ________________________
1. One would be wise to be humble.
2. But we might be the first generation to actually reach the frontier.
3. But we might be the first generation to deal with the crisis.
4. However, this time the success is not illusory.

Paragraph Completion CAT by Cetking

Solutions

Must do

PARAGRAPH
COMPLETION

All questions taken from CETKING verbal advance book:

Paragraph Completion CAT

Sample questions
Directions for questions 1 to 4: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

1. Most people at their first consultation take a furtive look at the surgeon’s hands in the hope of reassurance. Prospective patients look for delicacy, sensitivity, steadiness, perhaps unblemished pallor. On this basis, Henry Perowne loses a number of cases each year. Generally, he knows it’s about to happen before the patient does: the downward glance repeated, the prepared questions beginning to falter, the overemphatic thanks during the retreat to the door.
(1) Other people do not communicate due to their poor observation.
(2) Other patients don’t like what they see but are ignorant of their right to go elsewhere.
(3) But Perowne himself is not concerned.
(4) But others will take their place, he thought.
(5) These hands are steady enough, but they are large.

2. Trade protectionism, disguised as concern for the climate, is raising its head. Citing competitiveness concerns, powerful industrialized countries are holding out threats of a levy on imports of energy-intensive products from developing countries that refuse to accept their demands. The actual source of protectionist sentiment in the OECD countries is, of course, their current lackluster economic performance, combined with the challenges posed by he rapid economic rise of China and India – in that order.
(1) Climate change is evoked to bring trade protectionism through the back door.
(2) OECD countries are taking refuge in climate change issues to erect trade barriers against these two countries.
(3) Climate change concerns have come as a convenient stick to beat the rising trade power of China and India.
(4) Defenders of the global economic status quo are posing as climate change champions.
(5) Today’s climate change champions are the perpetrators of global economic inequity.

3. Mattancherry is Indian Jewry’s most famous settlement. Its pretty streets of pastel coloured houses, connected by first-floor passages and home to the last twelve saree-and-sarongwearing, white-skinned Indian Jews are visited by thousands of tourists each year. Its synagogue, built in 1568, with a floor of blue-and-white Chinese tiles, a carpet given by Haile Selassie and the frosty Yaheh selling tickets at the door, stands as an image of religious tolerance.
(1) Mattancherry represents, therefore, the perfect picture of peaceful co-existence.
(2) India’s Jews have almost never suffered discrimination, except for European colonizers and each other.
(3) Jews in India were always tolerant.
(4) Religious tolerance has always been only a facade and nothing more.
(5) The pretty pastel streets are, thus, very popular with the tourists.

Paragraph Completion CAT by Cetking

4. Given the cultural and intellectual interconnections, the question of what is ‘Western’ and what is ‘Eastern’ (or Indian) is often hard to decide, and the issue can be discussed only in more dialectical terms. The diagnosis of a thought as ‘purely Western’ or ‘purely Indian’ can be very illusory.
(1) Thoughts are not the kind of things that can be easily categorized.
(2) Though ‘occidentalism’ and ‘orientalism’ as dichotomous concepts have found many adherents.
(3) ‘East is East and West is West’ has been a discredited notion for a long time now.
(4) Compartmentalizing thoughts is often desirable.
(5) The origin of a thought is not the kind of thing to which ‘purity’ happens easily.

Directions for Questions 5 to 7: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the sentence that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way. CAT 2007

5. Characters are also part of deep structure. Characters tie events in a story together and provide a thread of continuity and meaning. Stories can be about individuals, groups, projects or whole organizations, so from an organizational studies perspective, the focal actor(s) determine the level and unit of analysis used in a study. Stories of mergers and acquisitions, for example, are common place. In these stories whole organizations are personified as actors. But these macro-level stories usually are not told from the perspective of the macro-level participants, because whole organizations cannot narrate their experiences in the first person.
(1) More generally, data concerning the identities and relationships of the characters in the story are required, if one is to understand role structure and social networks in which that process is embedded.
(2) Personification of a whole organization abstracts away from the particular actors and from traditional notions of level of analysis.
(3) The personification of a whole organization is important because stories differ depending on who is enacting various events.
(4) Every story is told from a particular point of view, with a particular narrative voice, which is not regarded as part of the deep structure.
(5) The personification of a whole organization is a textual device we use to make macro-level theories more comprehensible.

6. Nevertheless, photographs still retain some of the magical allure that the earliest daguerreotypes inspired.
As objects, our photographs have changed; they have become physically flimsier as they have become more technologically sophisticated. Daguerre produced pictures on copper plates; today many of our photographs never become tangible thins, but instead remain filed away on computers and cameras, part of the digital ether that envelops the modern world. At the same time, our patience for the creation of images has also eroded. Children today are used to being tracked from birth by digital cameras and video recorders and they expect to see the results of their poses and performances instantly. The space between life as it is being lived and life as it is being displayed shrinks to a mere second.
(1) Yet, despite these technical developments, photographs still remain powerful because they are reminders of the people and things we care about.
(2) Images, after all, are surrogates carried into battle by a soldier or by a traveller on holiday.
(3) Photographs, be they digital or traditional, exist to remind us of the absent, the beloved, and the dead.
(4) In the new era of the digital image, the images also have a greater potential for fostering falsehood and trickery, perpetuating fictions that seem so real we cannot tell the difference.
(5) Anyway, human nature being what it is, little time has passed after photography’s inventions became means of living life through images.

7. Mma Ramotswe had a detective agency in Africa, at the foot of Kgale Hill. These were its assets; a tiny white van, two desks, two chairs, a telephone, and an old typewriter. Then there was a teapot, in which Mma Ramotswe – the only private lady detective in Botswana – brewed red bush tea. And three mugs – one for herself, one for her secretary and one for the client. What else does a detective agency really nee? Detective agencies rely on human intuition and intelligence, both of which Mma Ramotswe had in abundance.
(1) But there was also the view, which again would appear on no inventory.
(2) No inventory would ever include those, of course.
(3) She had an intelligent secretary too.
(4) She was a good detective and a good woman.
(5) What she lacked in possessions was more than made up by a natural shrewdness.

Paragraph Completion CAT by Cetking

Directions for Questions 8 to 12: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the one that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way.

I am sometimes attacked for imposing ‘rules‘. Nothing could be further from the truth. I hate rules. All I do is report on how consumers react to different stimuli. I may say to a copywriter, —Research shows that commercials with celebrities are below average in persuading people to buy products. Are you sure you want to use a celebrity? Call that a rule? Or I may say to an art director, —Research suggests that if you set the copy in black type on a white background, more people will read it than if you set it in white type on a black background.“
Guidance based on applied research can hardly qualify as ‘rules‘.
Thus, all my so called ‘rules‘ are rooted in applied research.
A suggestion perhaps, but scarcely a rule.
Such principles are unavoidable if one wants to be systematic about consumer behavior.
Fundamentally it is about consumer behavior œ not about celebrities or type settings

9. Relations between the factory and the dealer are distant and usually strained as the factory tries to force cars on the dealers to smooth out production. Relations between the dealer and the customer are equally strained because dealers continuously adjust prices œ make deals œ to adjust demand with supply while maximizing profits. This becomes a system marked by a lack of long-term commitment on either side, which maximizes feelings of mistrust. In order to maximize their bargaining positions, everyone holds back information œ the dealer about the product and the consumer about his true desires.
1. As a result, “deal making‘ becomes rampant, without concern for customer satisfaction.
2. As a result, inefficiencies creep into the supply chain.
3. As a result, everyone treats the other as an adversary, rather than as an ally.
4. As a result, fundamental innovations are becoming scarce in the automobile industry.
5. As a result, everyone loses in the long run.

10. In the evolving world order, the comparative advantage of the United States lies in its military force. Diplomacy and international law have always been regarded as annoying encumbrances, unless they can be used to advantage against an enemy. Every active player in world affairs professes to seek only peace and to prefer negotiation to violence and coercion.
1. However, diplomacy has often been used as a mask by nations which intended to use force.
2. However, when the veil is lifted, we commonly see that diplomacy is understood as a disguise for the rule of force.
3. However, history has shown that many of these nations do not practice what they profess.
4. However, history tells us that peace is professed by those who intend to use violence.
5. However, when unmasked, such nations reveal a penchant for the use of force.

11. Age has a curvilinear relationship with the exploitation of opportunity. Initially, age will increase the likelihood that a person will exploit an entrepreneurial opportunity because people gather much of the knowledge necessary to exploit opportunities over the course of their lives, and because age provides credibility in transmitting that information to others. However, as people become older, their willingness to bear risks declines, their opportunity costs rise, and they become less receptive to new information.
1. As a result, people transmit more information rather than experiment with new ideas as they reach an advanced age.
2. As a result, people are reluctant to experiment with new ideas as they reach an advanced age.
3. As a result, only people with lower opportunity costs exploit opportunity when they reach an advanced age.
4. As a result, people become reluctant to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities when they reach an advanced age.
5. As a result, people depend on credibility rather than on novelty as they reach an advanced age.

12. We can usefully think of theoretical models as maps, which help us navigate unfamiliar territory. The most accurate map that it is possible to construct would be of no practical use whatsoever, for it would be an exact replica, on exactly the same scale, of the place where we were. Good maps pull out the most important features and throw away a huge amount of much less valuable information. Of course, maps can be bad as well as good œ witness the attempts by medieval Europe to produce a map of the world. In the same way, a bad theory, no matter how impressive it may seem in principle, does little or nothing to help us understand a problem.
1. But good theories, just like good maps, are invaluable, even if they are simplified.
2. But good theories, just like good maps, will never represent unfamiliar concepts in detail.
3. But good theories, just like good maps, need to balance detail and feasibility of representation.
4. But good theories, just like good maps, are accurate only at a certain level of abstraction.
5. But good theories, just like good maps, are useful in the hands of a user who knows their limitations.

Directions for Questions 13 to 16: Each of the following questions has a paragraph from which the last sentence has been deleted. From the given options, choose the one that completes the paragraph in the most appropriate way. CAT 2005

13. The audiences for crosswords and sudoku, understandably, overlap greatly, but there are differences, too. A crossword attracts a more literary person, while sudoku appeals to a keenly logical mind. Some crossword enthusiasts turn up their noses at sudoku because they feel it lacks depth. A good crossword requires vocabulary, knowledge, mental flexibility and sometimes even a sense of humor to complete. It touches numerous areas of life and provides an “Aha!” or two along the way. _______________________
1. Sudoku, on the other hand, is just a logical exercise, each one similar to the last.
2. Sudoku, incidentally, is growing faster in popularity than crosswords, even among the literati.
3. Sudoku, on the other hand, can be attempted and enjoyed even by children.
4. Sudoku, however, is not exciting in any sense of the term

14. Most firms consider expert individuals to be too elitist, temperamental, egocentric, and difficult to work with. Force such people to collaborate on a high-stakes project and they just might come to fisticuffs. Even the very notion of managing such a group seems unimaginable. So most organizations fall into default mode, setting up project teams of people who get along nicely. ________________________
1. The result, however, is disastrous.
2. The result is mediocrity.
3. The result is creation of experts who then become elitists.
4. Naturally, they drive innovations.

15. Federer’s fifth grand slam win prompted a reporter to ask whether he was the best ever. Federer is certainly not lacking in confidence, but he wasn’t about to proclaim himself the best ever. “The best player of this generation, yes”, he said, “But nowhere close to ever. Just look at the records that some guys have. I’m a minnow.” ________________________
1. His win against Agassi, a genius from the previous generation, contradicts that.
2. Sampras, the king of an earlier generation, was as humble.
3. He is more than a minnow to his contemporaries.
4. The difference between ‘the best of this generation’ and ‘the best ever’ is a matter of perception.’

16. Thus the end of knowledge and the closing of the frontier that it symbolizes is not a looming crisis at all, but merely one of many embarrassing fits of hubris in civilization’s long industry. In the end, it will pass away and be forgotten. Ours is not the first generation to struggle to understand the organizational laws of the frontier, deceive itself that it has succeeded, and go to its grave having failed. ________________________
1. One would be wise to be humble.
2. But we might be the first generation to actually reach the frontier.
3. But we might be the first generation to deal with the crisis.
4. However, this time the success is not illusory.

Paragraph Completion CAT by Cetking

Detailed solutions given in CETKING advance verbal book

Paragraphs

1. (3). In the paragraph the author suggests why the doctor loses some of his patients. Option 5 can be easily eliminated as the pronoun “these” has no antecedent in the para. Option 2 & 4 are farfetched as they are to do with the doctor’s attitude towards the problem, which the para does not indicate in any way. Option 1 can also be done away with as it suggests those patients who fail to speak up and not about those who leave his treatment, as indicated in the para. Option 3 fits in perfectly.

2. (4). Options 1 and 3 are very generalized statements. Option 2 is a repetition of the idea presented in the beginning of the paragraph. The para talks about how developed countries indulge in trade protectionism as a move against China and India’s economic rise , under the guise of climate concern. Option 4 and 5 talk about the same thing but 4 goes along with the subtle suggestive tone of the para while 5 is more curt in its accusation of ‘perpetrators of inequity’.

3. (2) The para is a description of the Jewry settlement,. (4) can be eliminated as it brings in a hint of skepticism. (3) is a mere repetition of an idea already discussed in the para (that of jews being tolerant). (5) can also be eliminated as it is brings an alien concept – that of Mattancherry’s popularity with the tourists . Between (1) and (2), we will eliminate (1) as it has a more conclusive tone, which is not in sync with the descriptive nature of the paragraph.

4. (5) Option 1 can be easily eliminated as it is a mere repetition of the ideas presented in the para. Option 2 is a little farfetched as it should come one or two more sentences later in the para . Option 3 does not match with the idea presented in the passage. Option 4 does not match with the tone of the paragraph. Option 5 completes the idea as the emphasis in the last line of the para is that the idea of ‘pure Western and pure Indian thoughts’ is deceptive.

5. The paragraph in the last line is trying to generate an idea of personification. From the last 3 lines of the paragraph we can understand, that its tough to give macro level stories from the perspective of the macro level participants. So its textual device we use to make it more comprehensible. Answer is The personification of a whole organization is a textual device we use to make macro-level theories more comprehensible.
http://books.google.com/books?id=zazOchpSJ_gC&pg=PA98&lpg=PA98&dq=the+squatters+land+was+more+intensely+alive+than+the+rest+of+the+farm+and+was+changing+with+the+seasons+the+year+round&source=web&ots=QllOCheO96&sig=B-ntIwNYY9cyKpjoMczdjNtluOQ#PPA98,M1

6. http://www.thenewatlantis.com/archive/10/rosen.htm
Answer is Yet, despite these technical developments, photographs still remain powerful because they are reminders of the people and things we care about.

7.http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/reader/034911675X/ref=sib_fs_top/203-6565312-3963140?ie=UTF8&p=S009&checkSum=Iuah%2B7H%2F1myv2wCcyYCSQPycqkdMA64J6Uvy67PuCIE%3D#readerlink
No inventory would ever include those, of course, as per the source.

8. The author tries to defend himself by saying that he never imposes rules. He gives as a couple of examples of his suggestions and questions whether a person would call it a ‘rule’. As the passage is defensive in tone choice 3 is the most appropriate which says that he gives only suggestions. Choice (3)

9. The passage explains the kind of differences that exist between the components in the supply chain, (ie. production to distribution to consumer). The nature of the differences result in a system lacking commitment on the part of the components, and lacking transparency. The para is best closed with the option that points to the logical result of such a situation – that is provided in choice 5 ‘everyone loses in the long run’. Choice 1 is inappropriate since, in ‘deal-making’, the customer would have his own satisfaction in mind. Choice 2 brings in circumstances that would follow in continuation. Choice 3 brings in a thought contrary to to tone of the paragraph Choice 4 is not relevant to the content of the paragraph. Choice (5)

10. All the choices provided seem to follow from the last line of the passage. However, since the statement indicates what is professed, the contradiction would be in the intentions behind that – best expressed in choice (2). In addition, choice 2 is the only sentence that corresponds to the singular “every active player” – all the other sentences use plurals. Choice (2)

11. The relationship between a person’s age and his likelihood of exploiting new opportunities is presented in the passage. When people gain more knowledge and experience they try to exploit new opportunities.
However, as they grow even older they try to avoid risks and become less receptive to new ideas. Hence at an advanced age, a person becomes reluctant to exploit new opportunities as he wants to avoid risks. Choice 2 can be eliminated as it categorically states that they are reluctant to ‘experiment with new ideas’. Since the context is of ‘entrepreneurial opportunity’ choice 4 becomes better as the concluding line. Choice 1 can be ruled out because the focus of the passage is on exploitation of opportunity whereas this option talks of ‘transmit more information’ and ‘experiment with new ideas’. Choice 3 says people with lower opportunity cost exploit opportunity when they became old whereas the passage says that ‘as people become older ……. Less receptive to new information’. Choice 5 introduces a new concept of ‘credibility’ which is inappropriate in the concluding line. Choice (4)

12. The passage compares maps with theories. Good maps give only the ‘most important features’ and leave out less valuable information. So too are good theories. Choice 2 categorically states that good theories ‘will
never represent unfamiliar concepts’ whereas a concept being familiar or unfamiliar depends on a person’s knowledge. Choice 3 can be ruled out because the passage does not talk of balancing details with feasibility of representation. Choice 4 cannot be he answer because maps don’t have to become abstract to be accurate. Choice 5 is not the answer because the para has not mentioned a user so far. Choice (1)

13. 1 The paragraph highlights the points of difference between Sudoku and a crossword.
14. 2 If experts are missing, then the result would be mediocrity.
15. 3 The idea of minnow is continued and contradicted.
16. 1 We cannot reach the frontier, hence we should be humble.

Paragraph Completion

 

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http://www.cetking.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/CAT-Para-Completion-Verbal-Must-do-questions-by-Cetking.pdf

 

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