Nobel Peace Prize 2015 and other famous winners

Nobel Peace Prize 2015 winners

Winners: Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet

2015 Nobel Prize for peace has been awarded to the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet, an alliance of civil society groups that has helped steer Tunisia from its 2011 Arab Spring revolution toward pluralistic democracy.

Beating competition
Nobel prize committee bypassed figures such as Pope Francis, Kenny and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, and handed the award to the Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet for Tunisia’s stability during the Arab rising and ISIS crisis.

Why Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet
The prize comes at an important time, as Tunisia faces a new crisis that is nearly as critical as the one it confronted in the fall of 2013: A pair of attacks against tourists earlier this year left more than 60 people dead, provoking fear and devastating Tunisia’s vital tourism sector, even as the faltering economy dragged support for the democratic process to historic lows.

The Nobel award also draws international attention to a region that is increasingly known more for the harrowing actions of the Islamic State group than the kind of compromise and negotiations that have allowed Tunisia to succeed.

Nobel Peace Prize
The Nobel Peace Prize is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel, along with the prizes in Chemistry, Physics, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature.

Most Famous Nobel Peace Prize Laureates

Kailash Satyarthi and Malala Yousafzai 2014
“for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education”

Barack Obama, 2009
“For his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples”

Kofi Annan, 2001
Shared with the United Nations “for their work for a better organized and more peaceful world”

Yitzhak Rabin, 1994
“To honour a political act which called for great courage on both sides, and which has opened up opportunities for a new development towards fraternity in the Middle East”

Yasser Arafat, 1994
To honour a political act which called for great courage on both sides, and which has opened up opportunities for a new development towards fraternity in the Middle East

Nelson Mandela, 1993
Shared with Frederik Willem de Klerk “for their work for the peaceful termination of the apartheid regime, and for laying the foundations for a new democratic South Africa”

Aung San Suu Kyi, 1991
“For her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights”

Mikhail Gorbachev, 1990
“For his leading role in the peace process which today characterizes important parts of the international community”

Mother Teresa, 1979
“The loneliest, the most wretched and the dying have, at her hands, received compassion without condescension, based on reverence for man”

Martin Luther King, Jr., 1964
“First person in the Western world to have shown us that a struggle can be waged without violence”

Theodore Roosevelt, 1906
“[F]or his successful mediation to end the Russo-Japanese war and for his interest in arbitration, having provided the Hague arbitration court with its very first case”